Category Archives: whisky

How to remix whiskey sour?

Foodpairing® is not exclusively for chefs. Foodpairing® lends itself perfectly for the creation of new cocktail recipes. Many award-winning cocktails have been designed with the aid of Foodpairing®.

Let’s take a look at the potential of Foodpairing® in cocktails, revisiting the classic Whiskey Sour.

As mentioned in the Asperges Maltaise Remix article, adding small twists to classic recipes can be as fun and challenging as designing completely new experiences. This article picks up on the notion of the twists.

When looking at the Foodpairing tree of any whiskey, one can find a whole bunch of matching ingredients. When focusing on herbs, spices or fruits (if you want even more challenging, go for vegetables, if you’re crazy, go for the meats. One can easily find inspiration for a twist on the basic theme of the whiskey sour.

Here are some nice simple examples:

Licorice Whiskey Sour by Tony Conigliaro

recipe: Tony Conigliaro Make a classic whiskey sour with egg white. Finsih the cocktail with some freshly grated liquorice.

Morroco mint Whiskey Sour

Recipe

  • 30 ml Whiskey (The Famous Grouse)
  • 10 ml tea syrup
  • 10 ml lemon juice

Add each ingredient in a shaker. Shake with ice.

Strain in a glass

 

Tea syrup:
For the preparation of our tea syrup, we used a herbal tea from the Lipton Brand, called Morocco. It’s a tea flavoured with cinnamon and mint.

  • 100 ml water
  • 2 tea bags
  • sugar

Bring the water to the boil. Add the tea bags and steep for at least 20 minutes. Sieve. Add the same amount of sugar to the tea. Bring to a boil for complete dissolution.

Bacon Whiskey Sour

Recipe

  • 30 ml bacon flavoured whiskey
  • 10 ml sugar syrup
  • 10 ml lemon juice

Add each ingredient in a shaker. Shake with ice.

Strain in a glass

 

Flavoured whiskey:

  • 30 g bacon
  • 100 ml whiskey (The Famous Grouse)

Fry the bacon with a dash of olive oil. Add  whiskey and let cool. Sieve off the bacon when the bacon flavour is strong enough in the whiskey (time depends on the bacon). Put the whiskey in the fridge to harden the fat. Sieve.

This bacon recipe might be more challenging; stretching the original theme of the whiskey sour. Yet these 3 recipes stay pretty close to the original one, adding extra ingredients as twists rather than substituting the original ingredients. True substitution is ofcourse also possible. Keeping our distance from “the best whiskey for a whiskey sour” discussion just for now, let’s turn our heads to alternatives for the lemon.

Lemon alternatives can readily be found in the Foodpairing® Explorer if you want to stay in the same flavour theme. Start a new search in the Foodpairing® Explorer. Search for lemon, add it to your combo box, then check out the best matches in the List view. Agreed, this is a bit of a cheat, forgetting about combining for a sec in our search for lemon alternatives. Nonetheless the obtained list will definitly spark your creativity… Nice ideas might be raspberry juice, sour pomegranate juice or passion fruit juice.

Here’s our favorite lemon replacement for the Whiskey Sour:

Sudashi Whiskey Sour

Recipe

  • 30 ml whiskey (The Famous Grouse)
  • 10 ml sudachi
  • a dash of lemon juice
  • 10 ml sugar syrup

Add each ingredient in a shaker. Shake with ice. Strain in a glass

Sudachi is less sour than lemon juice. To balance the cocktail we added a dash of lemon juice.

When tasting Sudachi you will notice some peppery notes. Why not finish the cocktail with some fresh grounded white pepper. Let the Foodpairing trees of whiskey inspire you…

Land of cotton; bourbon and peanut cherry lime

The land of cotton by Stuart White is a nice example of what Foodpairing can lead to. I don’t think Stuart White applied our Foodpairing to combine bourbon and peanut, but if you have a tiki mindsent the chance is very high you will end up with a combination based on Foodpairing. Rum and butter a surprise? No really if you use Foodpairing (and you will find it much more easier).

Not sure how Stuart came up with the combination, but this is how it could work;

Image you live in a place like Georgia where lots of peanuts are grown. Peanut are nut like … almonds. Why not replace the almonds from the orgeat by peanuts?

House-made Peanut Orgeat (by Stuart White):
500 grams skinless blanched Georgia peanuts
800 milliliters water
700 grams sugar
100 milliliters white whiskey
Ok, then you want to know which distilled drink to combine. If it is a tiki drink, you would probably go for rum, but as the list view show you, bourbon and peanut is a better match than rum (ranking indicated).
Peanut and whisky is not new; peanut butter infused whisky was done at tailor like Dave Arnold indicates in this nytimes article from 2010.
Top of the list was actually Cointreau. I would make sense to add Cointreau, but maybe that would have been an obvious variation on a mai tai. Fruity notes can also come from eg cherry. But it could also have been pineapple, coconut, mango, but ya…if you want to make a local cocktail that is maybe not an option, from the Foodpairing explorer indicates that blackcurrant, plum, cranberry, cherry also work.
which makes finally a whisky-peanut-cherry-lime combination.
You can find the complete recipe at starchefs (also source picture cocktail)
And more inspiration in the Foodpairing tree;

Woodsy flavors are hot! Wood smoke flavor chart

Smoke signals, an article by the Wall Street Journal, points at the growing frequency of smoke to the dessert menu.
We also noticed it by requests of chefs to add different types of smoke to our database.
This Foodpairing tree (a wood smoke flavor chart) will give you some inspiration about where wood smoke makes a good match, more specific types of wood will follow in the future. All the ingredients around the center can be matched with wood smoke.

E.g. Bourbon icecream tart with bacon and smoked salt by Craigie on Main. In the Foodpairing tree you see vanilla (in the group of herbs and spices) very close to the middle of the chart. This indicates it is a very good match, but you will also find bacon, chocolate, coffee, rooibos tea…

 

National cheese day

We added already quite some Foodpairing recipes with cheese (click here e.g. for goat cheese recipes – scroll down) to the Foodpairing.com website.
For National Cheese Day we added a few new combinations linking beer to cheese. More recipes (about 20) will be added soon with different Belgian beers.E.g. cream cheese – pineapple – mango – bourbon whisky linking to Gueuze Fond Tradition.

Link recipe

WORLD WHISKY DAY

To celebrate World Whiskey Day, we are sharing a Moroccan twist on the Whiskey Sour classic cocktail.

15 ml of Whiskey
10 ml lemon juice
2 g of cinnamon stick
10 ml of syrup with peppermint, cinnamon, licorice

Crush the cinnamon sticks, add ice, shake with the other ingredients. Double strain.

As you notice in the Foodpairing tree, Whisky embraces the whole world; Italy, Spain, Peru, Papua N. Guinea, Japan, Australia, France,….

SAFFRON INFUSED COCKTAILS

At Barchef in Toronto, Ai Fiori in New York,… you have cocktails with infusions of saffron. Saffron is not always added for its flavor only, but here you have an overview of possible combinations with saffron based on its flavor profile;

Here an example by Eben Freeman (Ai Fiori): Aperitivo

A movie how to make it;   
Foodspotting the Bar at Ai Fiori: “Aperitivo” Cocktail from Ai Fiori on Vimeo.
And the saffron sour of Barchef in Toronto;

Gin should also fit, but I’m missing still a lot of analysis on different types of gin. Any brand interested?