Category Archives: bacon

How to remix whiskey sour?

Foodpairing® is not exclusively for chefs. Foodpairing® lends itself perfectly for the creation of new cocktail recipes. Many award-winning cocktails have been designed with the aid of Foodpairing®.

Let’s take a look at the potential of Foodpairing® in cocktails, revisiting the classic Whiskey Sour.

As mentioned in the Asperges Maltaise Remix article, adding small twists to classic recipes can be as fun and challenging as designing completely new experiences. This article picks up on the notion of the twists.

When looking at the Foodpairing tree of any whiskey, one can find a whole bunch of matching ingredients. When focusing on herbs, spices or fruits (if you want even more challenging, go for vegetables, if you’re crazy, go for the meats. One can easily find inspiration for a twist on the basic theme of the whiskey sour.

Here are some nice simple examples:

Licorice Whiskey Sour by Tony Conigliaro

recipe: Tony Conigliaro Make a classic whiskey sour with egg white. Finsih the cocktail with some freshly grated liquorice.

Morroco mint Whiskey Sour

Recipe

  • 30 ml Whiskey (The Famous Grouse)
  • 10 ml tea syrup
  • 10 ml lemon juice

Add each ingredient in a shaker. Shake with ice.

Strain in a glass

 

Tea syrup:
For the preparation of our tea syrup, we used a herbal tea from the Lipton Brand, called Morocco. It’s a tea flavoured with cinnamon and mint.

  • 100 ml water
  • 2 tea bags
  • sugar

Bring the water to the boil. Add the tea bags and steep for at least 20 minutes. Sieve. Add the same amount of sugar to the tea. Bring to a boil for complete dissolution.

Bacon Whiskey Sour

Recipe

  • 30 ml bacon flavoured whiskey
  • 10 ml sugar syrup
  • 10 ml lemon juice

Add each ingredient in a shaker. Shake with ice.

Strain in a glass

 

Flavoured whiskey:

  • 30 g bacon
  • 100 ml whiskey (The Famous Grouse)

Fry the bacon with a dash of olive oil. Add  whiskey and let cool. Sieve off the bacon when the bacon flavour is strong enough in the whiskey (time depends on the bacon). Put the whiskey in the fridge to harden the fat. Sieve.

This bacon recipe might be more challenging; stretching the original theme of the whiskey sour. Yet these 3 recipes stay pretty close to the original one, adding extra ingredients as twists rather than substituting the original ingredients. True substitution is ofcourse also possible. Keeping our distance from “the best whiskey for a whiskey sour” discussion just for now, let’s turn our heads to alternatives for the lemon.

Lemon alternatives can readily be found in the Foodpairing® Explorer if you want to stay in the same flavour theme. Start a new search in the Foodpairing® Explorer. Search for lemon, add it to your combo box, then check out the best matches in the List view. Agreed, this is a bit of a cheat, forgetting about combining for a sec in our search for lemon alternatives. Nonetheless the obtained list will definitly spark your creativity… Nice ideas might be raspberry juice, sour pomegranate juice or passion fruit juice.

Here’s our favorite lemon replacement for the Whiskey Sour:

Sudashi Whiskey Sour

Recipe

  • 30 ml whiskey (The Famous Grouse)
  • 10 ml sudachi
  • a dash of lemon juice
  • 10 ml sugar syrup

Add each ingredient in a shaker. Shake with ice. Strain in a glass

Sudachi is less sour than lemon juice. To balance the cocktail we added a dash of lemon juice.

When tasting Sudachi you will notice some peppery notes. Why not finish the cocktail with some fresh grounded white pepper. Let the Foodpairing trees of whiskey inspire you…

Coffee appetizers

Coffee is most often associated with the after-dinner, served alongside the dessert or even used in them. Such a fine and versatile product should not but limited to this narrow use moment. Let’s explore how you can surprise your guests by using coffee in your appetizers.

Changing the use moment of products or putting them out of their traditional context often evokes strong reactions, yet when done properly you can count on a grand applause. Foodpairing can help you in the process of finding the right balance.

Start by navigating to the Foodpairing of coffee in the Foodpairing Explorer.

It’s our objective to combine coffee in an appetizer, so we specifically searched for fresh and not too sweet ingredients, i.e. ingredients that are suitable for appetizing. We also took care to incorporate fun texture contrasts which are highly desirable in an appetizer as they stimulate the eater’s curiosity for what’s to come.

Fried bacon with deep fried onions and coffee

Ingredients:

  • 2 slices bacon
  • 10 g fried onions
  • 1 g ground coffee
  • 4 teaspoons brined mustard seeds

Prepartions:

Mustard seeds:
Mix 200 g mustard seed with 355 ml water, 355 ml rice vinegar, 100 g sugar and 12 g salt. Bring to a boil and simmer for 45 ‘. If the seeds are not cooked, add some extra water and simmer a little longer. Allow to cool

Fry the bacon in some butter

Mix the onions with the grounded coffee

more recipes here

Savory smoothie recipes

Fruits are the traditional first choice for smoothies, but let’s take a look beyond convention and start experimenting with the veggies and herbs in savory smoothie recipes

When investigating the Foodpairing® tree of milk and turning our heads towards the vegetable category, you’ll spot cucumber –use the category filter in the listview to get a list of best matching vegetables. Cucumber consists of more than 90% of water, so instead of adding crushed ice to get the smoothie cold, just refrigerate the blended cucumber before use. Next we add olive oil for the body, cilantro and chives for some kick and sherry vinegar to brighten the flavours. All ingredients were found with the help of the Foodpairing® Explorer.

Recipe

  • 335 g cucumber
  • 3 g of cilantro
  • 18 g chives
  • 175 g milk
  • 10 g sherry vinegar
  • 75 g olive oil
  • pepper and salt

Dice the cucumber. Chop the chives and cilantro. Blend all ingredients. Add the olive oil in a continuous trickle. Season to taste, pass through a fine mesh and refrigerate.

Serve with garnishes like shrimp or mussels.

Next recipe was also made staring from the Foodpairing tree of milk, it’s a savory smoothie with tomato and basil:

Recipe

  • 255 g canned tomatoes*
  • 3 g basil
  • 100 g milk
  • 20 g mozzarella water
  • 25 g mozzarella
  • pepper and salt

Blend all ingredients. Season to taste, pass through a fine mesh and refrigerate.

* canned tomatoes give more taste to the smoothie than fresh one.

Furaneol is one of the molecules tomato and strawberry share. The same goes for raspberry and tomato, applying this neat little combo in a veggie smoothie is just magic. For the base we selected mozzarella but cottage cheese would also be great, added some fresh basil to give it a nice twist. When you get the proportions right one can enhance the fruitiness of tomato by adding strawberries or raspberries without losing the characteristic tomato flavor.

Recipe

  • 255 g canned tomatoes
  • 3 g basil
  • 150 g milk
  • 40 g raspberries
  • 10 g ketchup
  • pepper and salt

Blend all ingredients. Season to taste, pass through a fine mesh and refrigerate.

Let’s talk milk. Milk is easy to infuse, this is because of its colloidal  (fat + water) properties. Infused milk allows for new aroma incorporation in a smoothie without using the actual flavoring ingredients; which could otherwise present textural, taste or other technical difficulties. Traditional examples are vanilla, cinnamon or anise infused milk. But please do go wild with the infusions, our favorites are shrimp, bacon, chicken skin and smoke infused milk. In our previous article about smoothies there is a smoothie with oat infused milk. Here is a more challenging recipe with bacon flavored milk.

Recipe

Bacon flavoured milk

  • 5 dl milk
  • 150 g smoked bacon

Bring the milk to the boil. Dice the smoked bacon and add to the hot milk. Cover with plastic clingfilm. Let infuse for at least 1 hour. Sieve

 

Smoothie

  • 150 g bacon flavoured milk
  • 100 g cooked peas
  • 1 g mint
  • pepper and salt

Blend all ingredients. Season to taste, pass through a fine mesh and refrigerate.

 

Instead of using plain olive oil in the cucumber smoothie, we can create more depth by using an infused oil. Here’s an example with red bell pepper and tomato.

Recipe

 

Chorizo oil

  • 1 garlic clove
  • 40 g chopped onion
  • 100 g diced chorizo
  • 200 g olive oil

Fry the garlic with the onion and chorizo in some oil. Add the remaining amount of oil. Let simmer for 5′ minutes. Cover with plastic clingpaper and let infuse for at least 1 hour. Sieve.

 

Smoothie

  • 100 g red bell pepper
  • 140 g milk
  • 20 g canned tomato
  • 5 g chorizo oil
  • pepper and salt

Blend all ingredients. Season to taste, pass through a fine mesh and refrigerate.

Woodsy flavors are hot! Wood smoke flavor chart

Smoke signals, an article by the Wall Street Journal, points at the growing frequency of smoke to the dessert menu.
We also noticed it by requests of chefs to add different types of smoke to our database.
This Foodpairing tree (a wood smoke flavor chart) will give you some inspiration about where wood smoke makes a good match, more specific types of wood will follow in the future. All the ingredients around the center can be matched with wood smoke.

E.g. Bourbon icecream tart with bacon and smoked salt by Craigie on Main. In the Foodpairing tree you see vanilla (in the group of herbs and spices) very close to the middle of the chart. This indicates it is a very good match, but you will also find bacon, chocolate, coffee, rooibos tea…

 

PAIRING THE APPLE SIDECAR OF RYAN MAGARIAN

Epicurious added a post on pairing cocktails with food, which is an idea we support of course. Ryan Magarian proposed the combination of his Apple sidecar and a grilled romaine lettuce with bacon, apple, and blue cheese (Roquefort) vinaigrette and a sidecar made with apple brandy

Well let’s check how this Foodpairing is constructed;

The recipe of the Apple sidecar;
1 1/2 oz Vodka
1/2 oz Apple brandy
1 oz Lemon juice
1 oz Simple syrup
1/2 oz Tangerine juice
1 pn Tangerine peel (shredded, as garnish)

Shake, strain, straight up, chilled sugar-rimmed cocktail glass